Anachronistic

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English Dictionary | anachronistic
anachronistic

/əˌnækrəˈnɪstɪk/

Word Reference  Random House Learner’s   Dictionary of American English © 2015
a•nach•ro•nis•tic /əˌnækrəˈnɪstɪk/ adj.
being or characteristic of an anachronism:A biplane is an anachronistic sight in the age of the Space Shuttle.
a•nach•ro•nis•ti•cal•ly,adv.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2015
a•nach•ro•nis•tic (ə nak′rə nis′tik),
adj.
pertaining to or containing an anachronism.
Also,a•nach′ro•nis′ti•cal.
Etymology:
anachron(ism) + -istic 1765–75
a•nach′ro•nis′ti•cal•ly, adv.

WordReference Random House Learner’s Dictionary of American English © 2015
a•nach•ro•nism /əˈnækrəˌnɪzəm/ n. [countable]
an error made in which a person, object, happening, etc., is assigned a date or period other than the correct one:It is an anachronism to write that atomic bombs were used in the Civil War.
a thing or person that belongs to an earlier time and is out of place in the present.
See -chron-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2015
a•nach•ro•nism (ə nak′rə niz′əm),
n.
something or someone that is not in its correct historical or chronological time, esp. a thing or person that belongs to an earlier time:The sword is an anachronism in modern warfare.
an error in chronology in which a person, object, event, etc., is assigned a date or period other than the correct one:To assign Michelangelo to the 14th century is an anachronism.Cf. parachronism, prochronism.
Etymology:1640–50; Latin anachronismus Greek anachronismós a wrong time reference, equivalent. to anachron(ízein) to make a wrong time reference (see ana-, chron-, -ize) + -ismos -ism
an•a•chron•i•cal•ly (an′ə kron′ik lē),
adv.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

anachronism /əˈnækrəˌnɪzəm/n
the representation of an event, person, or thing in a historical context in which it could not have occurred or existed
a person or thing that belongs or seems to belong to another time

Photo1423
Etymology: 17th Century: from Latin anachronismus, from Greekanakhronismos a mistake in chronology, from anakhronizein to err in a time reference, from ana- + khronos time

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